Superalloy

June 15, 2013 - 10:30am

Imet Alloys (U.S. Pavilion, Hall 3, AB110), a first-time exhibitor at the Paris Air Show, which describes itself as “an ambitious global company specializing in the control and management of superalloy and titanium from the aviation industry.” Founded by CEO Ruaraidh Williamson in 2011 and headquartered in Monroe, North Carolina, Imet Alloys helps companies control their superalloy and titanium scrap, known in the industry as “revert.”

June 19, 2011 - 6:00am

Chromalloy, one of the world’s largest independent providers of advanced coatings and repairs for gas turbine engines and a manufacturer of approved engine replacement parts, this year marks its 60th anniversary with ongoing growth and a change in scenery. The company this fall will relocate its corporate headquarters from Orangeburg, New York, to Palm Beach Gardens, Florida.

February 16, 2011 - 10:00am

A ceramic core facility is under construction in Tampa and slated to be operational by the first quarter of 2012. Chromalloyís new $5 million, 40,000-sq-ft facility will be built adjacent to its two-month-old, $30 million, 150,000-sq-ft industrial investment foundry. It will allow the company to pour up to one million pounds of superalloy turbine components and parts for aerospace, aero-derivative and industrial gas turbine engines.

July 16, 2010 - 11:59pm

Snecma and GE Aviation are developing new materials to make future engines lighter and improve their efficiency. In the works are alloys using exotic metals such as niobium, and composites using organic, ceramic or metal matrices. The two companies will employ these technologies for the Leap-X engine they are developing under their CFM joint venture (Hall 4 Stand B13) and possibly for other projects.

June 20, 2007 - 11:07am

Rolls-Royce’s U.S. branch has acquired the exclusive rights to use a new heat-resistant turbine blade coating invented by Iowa State University. The coating improves the durability and reliability of the ceramic thermal barrier applied to the blades to withstand metal temperatures approaching 2,100 degrees Fahrenheit.

 
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