Tablet PC

May 13, 2012 - 2:15am

DAC International (Stand 1131) has introduced the GDC64 tablet-to-aircraft interface, a small box that delivers aircraft data to devices such as the iPad and Android tablet computers and provides iPad battery charging. The GDC64 will be approved for Part 25 aircraft and can accept up to four Arinc 429 inputs, eight other discrete data inputs and serial data from a weather receiver.

October 10, 2011 - 5:02pm
Man using iPad

Apple’s iPad tablet computer is only about a year-and-a-half old, and in a short period of time it has exploded into aviation, unleashing a furious expenditure of creative energy by developers of applications for the compact and powerful portable device. Apps range from preflight performance calculators to flight planners and in-flight moving maps.

February 22, 2011 - 12:30pm

The $12,500 price tag on ASiQ’s mobile phone app might seem pricey, but by comparison with the $500,000 private jet mobile phone systems currently in service, it seems reasonable.

February 4, 2008 - 9:26am

The FAA has issued a long-awaited amendment to an advisory circular that outlines operational guidelines for anyone seeking to fly with so-called electronic flight bag (EFB) portable computers. Eliminating confusion that accompanied the original draft AC, the revised document, AC 120-76A, clarifies many of the requirements for certification, airworthiness and operational approval of EFB devices.

February 4, 2008 - 9:26am

The FAA has issued a long-awaited amendment to an advisory circular that outlines operational guidelines for anyone seeking to fly with so-called electronic flight bag (EFB) portable computers. Eliminating confusion that accompanied the original draft AC, the revised document, AC 120-76A, clarifies many of the requirements for certification, airworthiness and operational approval of EFB devices.

December 5, 2007 - 12:37pm

Purveyors of electronic flight bag (EFB) tablet computers are introducing new models and capabilities for the new year, with three notable models worthy of consideration for business jet operators in the market for the latest technology.

Chicago-based navAero has developed the t•BagC22 EFB as a class-2 device using a commercial off-the-shelf remote computer and a separate display.

April 24, 2007 - 10:53am

Mercury Computer Systems introduced two new class II-qualified electronic flight bag (EFB) systems targeting operators of larger aircraft. Mercury’s original VistaNav EFB class-I CIS-1000 is a tablet PC offering a 2-D or 3-D synthetic view of the outside world, including highway-in-the-sky approaches. The tablet receives wireless signals from a separate inertial navigation unit housing a WAAS GPS receiver and solid-state gyros.

April 3, 2007 - 7:50am

CMC Electronics has introduced the CMA-1100, a handheld electronic flight bag (EFB) computer for the cockpit that fills a gap between off-the-shelf tablet PCs typically costing less than $5,000 and permanently installed devices that can top $30,000.

 
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