XL Airways Germany A320 Flight 888T

May 27, 2011 - 6:58am

A statement released today by the French BEA (Bureau d'Enquêtes et d'Analyses) on the July 1, 2009 crash of Air France Flight 447 indicates that the airplane’s decent into the South Atlantic lasted three minutes, 30 seconds, during which the pilots at the controls maintained nose-up inputs.

May 23, 2011 - 11:40am
Recovery crews pull the remains of Flight 447’s avionics bay from the South A...

Both Airbus and the French BEA (Bureau d’Enquêtes et d’Analyses) have denied reaching any conclusions about the June 1, 2009, crash of Air France Flight 447, following reports in the French media that Airbus advised its customers that investigators had found no technical faults with the accident aircraft, an A330-200 that crashed into the South Atlantic on June 1, 2009, implying human error.

May 16, 2011 - 10:02am

French accident investigators over the weekend extracted the data from the memory cards inside the flight recorders recovered from the ill-fated Air France Flight 447, increasing the likelihood that they’ll finally reach a conclusion about the cause of the June 1, 2009 crash into the South Atlantic that killed 228.

September 29, 2010 - 10:56am

The November 2008 fatal crash of an Airbus A320 into the Mediterranean Sea off Perpignan, France, was the result of the pilots’ improvisation of procedures during an “operational flight check,” raising the crew’s workload to the point that it failed to notice that two angle-of-attack sensors were jammed, according to France’s accident investigation bureau, the BEA.

September 18, 2010 - 11:17am

The November 2008 crash of an Airbus A320 into the Mediterranean Sea off Perpignan, France, was mainly due to the pilots’ improvisation of procedures during an “operational flight check,” leading to a heavy workload that prevented the crew from seeing that two angle-of-attack sensors were jammed, according to France’s investigation bureau BEA.

June 29, 2009 - 4:54am
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The National Transportation Safety Board has launched investigations into two recent incidents in which airspeed and altitude indications in Airbus A330s might have malfunctioned, adding to the suspicion that an instrument failure could have led to the June 1 loss of an Air France A330-200 (Flight 447) in the Atlantic Ocean, killing 228 people.  

February 27, 2009 - 8:37am

This week’s interim report by France’s Bureau d’Enquetes et d’Analyses (BEA) on the November 27 crash of an XL Airways-operated A320 off the coast of France recommends that the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) detail in operations regulations the types of non-revenue flights operators may perform and require precise description of such flights in aircraft operations manuals.

 
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