Fixed-wing aircraft

March 31, 2008 - 6:33am

Water that pooled under the floor panels of a Falcon 20, froze and restricted the movement of the aileron trim actuator as the airplane was landing at London Stansted Airport is to blame for the airplane’s “frozen” controls, according to the UK Air Accidents Investigation Branch.

March 25, 2008 - 6:55am

While the FAA is calling for “significant” continued growth “over time” for commercial aviation, it sees “strong growth in business aviation demand continuing, driven by a growing U.S. and world economy as well as a growing fleet of very light jets (VLJs).”

March 11, 2008 - 12:15pm

The FAA is mandating updated aircraft cockpit voice and flight data recorders for airplanes with 10 or more seats and operating under Parts 121, 125 or 135. These improved devices–which are due by March 7, 2012, for in-service airplanes–will yield more data for accident and incident investigators. The rule also mandates these enhancements on all newly built aircraft and helicopters after March 7, 2010.

February 26, 2008 - 7:10am

SimCom instructor Ted Otto knows the PC-12. With about 3,000 hours flying the roomy single-engine Swiss turboprop, Otto is one of those rare pilots who not only knows his subject intimately but also knows how to share his knowledge with pilots who travel to SimCom Training Centers’ Orlando, Fla. headquarters to learn how to fly the PC-12.

February 8, 2008 - 11:04am

Cessna 525A CJ2, Tampa, Fla., Feb. 16, 2006–The NTSB said that the Zinc Acquisitions Citation’s swerving to the right on landing was caused by the failure of the left main and the auxiliary brake lines due to fatigue cracking, making directional control impossible. A contributing factor was the airport sign concrete pad, which the jet hit.

February 8, 2008 - 11:04am

Cessna 525A CJ2, Tampa, Fla., Feb. 16, 2006–The NTSB said that the Zinc Acquisitions Citation’s swerving to the right on landing was caused by the failure of the left main and the auxiliary brake lines due to fatigue cracking, making directional control impossible. A contributing factor was the airport sign concrete pad, which the jet hit.

February 8, 2008 - 11:01am

Aero Commander 690A, Antlers, Okla., Oct. 15, 2006–The NTSB blamed the
in-flight breakup of the experimental Aero Commander on the pilot’s failure to reduce airspeed in moderate turbulence. Contributing factors were his decision to exceed the maximum takeoff weight, and the prevailing turbulence.

February 8, 2008 - 11:01am

Aero Commander 690A, Antlers, Okla., Oct. 15, 2006–The NTSB blamed the
in-flight breakup of the experimental Aero Commander on the pilot’s failure to reduce airspeed in moderate turbulence. Contributing factors were his decision to exceed the maximum takeoff weight, and the prevailing turbulence.

February 8, 2008 - 10:51am

Cessna Citation 650, Atlantic City, N.J., Oct. 27, 2007–Citation N697MC came in “low and slow” on approach to Atlantic City International Airport and landed hard, substantially damaging the jet. The captain told the copilot to increase power, but the copilot “seemed confused” about different airspeed readings on the right- and left-side panel displays.

February 8, 2008 - 10:51am

Cessna Citation 650, Atlantic City, N.J., Oct. 27, 2007–Citation N697MC came in “low and slow” on approach to Atlantic City International Airport and landed hard, substantially damaging the jet. The captain told the copilot to increase power, but the copilot “seemed confused” about different airspeed readings on the right- and left-side panel displays.

 
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