Aviation medicine

September 11, 2014 - 3:03pm

As concerns grow over whether recent accidents involved hypoxia, including the TBM900 crash on Friday, pilots might wonder about simple tools to help them detect when hypoxia is imminent or occurring. Though pressurized aircraft have alarms that warn when cabin altitude climbs too high, the ubiquitous mobile devices that most pilots carry can also pitch in to help.

September 11, 2014 - 2:50pm

USAIG has added aviation training company Aircare International to its Performance Vector safety initiative. The addition broadens the program’s options to include Aircare’s Facts Training aircrew emergency procedures courses, as well as mission safety and telemedical support services. This supplements Aircare’s one-day pilot emergency procedures course, which uses cabin egress and firefighting simulators and in-pool drills.

May 1, 2014 - 12:45am

The FAA will begin formal rulemaking to consider whether to allow private pilots to use a driver’s license in lieu of an FAA medical certificate in some circumstances, the agency announced on April 2. The announcement comes two years after the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) and the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) filed a joint petition asking the FAA to expand the third-class medical exemption to cover more recreational pilots.

April 21, 2014 - 1:11pm

The FAA last week proposed a $547,500 civil penalty against Hawaiian Airlines for operating a Boeing 767-300 “more than 5,000 times” when the aircraft was not in compliance with a July 2000 airworthiness directive (AD). The AD required inspections of certain engine thrust reverser components to prevent a portion of the device from separating in flight and causing a rapid decompression of the aircraft. It also mandated initial and repetitive inspections of the components to detect damage and wear, and to take corrective actions if necessary.

January 3, 2014 - 5:20am

Lufthansa Technik (LHT) is studying ways to reduce the loads imposed on a bizliner’s interior walls and their structural attachments by a sudden drop in cabin pressure. The solution appears to lie in installing large cutouts in the walls and floor.

January 1, 2014 - 2:25am

Ever since two pilots fell asleep in the cockpit of a Bombardier CRJ operating as Go! Flight 1002 during a February 2008 flight from Honolulu to Hilo, Hawaii, the NTSB has urged the FAA to tackle the issue of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) among pilots. The captain of that aircraft was diagnosed with severe OSA after the flight.

October 29, 2013 - 3:05pm

By the time hypoxia is detected, it’s often too late, and the higher the cabin altitude, the less time pilots have to realize that they need to don oxygen masks.

October 16, 2013 - 12:25pm

The FAA has issued an airworthiness directive for the Boeing 737-600, -700, -700C, -800, and -900 series. The AD was prompted by a report of cracks found in the skin at body station 540 just below stringer S-22L on a 737-700.

October 14, 2013 - 6:00pm

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has concluded that the improper installation of a fuselage crown skin panel during the manufacturing process was the probable cause of substantial damage to a Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 during a rapid decompression incident in April 2011.

October 10, 2013 - 12:20am
View from a business jet

While the U.S. government is on a Congress-created enforced shutdown, the aviation industry might be tempted to wonder what the FAA actually accomplishes. What we are learning is that a lot of what the FAA does is process paperwork. And when the paperwork stops flowing, we can be forced to stop flying.

 
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