Security

June 30, 2009 - 10:07am

As business aviation has matured, the lessons learned from accidents and incidents have led to significant improvements in design, technology, materials and maintenance–all of which have made business jets one of the safest forms of transportation.

June 29, 2009 - 11:16am

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) appears to be taking seriously the 7,000-plus submitted comments opposing the proposed large aircraft security program (LASP) regulations. John Sammon, TSA assistant administrator for transportation sector network management, soothed attendees at the NATA Air Charter Summit last month when he said, “We rely to a large extent on NATA members for developing operational solutions.

June 29, 2009 - 8:11am

General aviation operations present such a limited and hypothetical threat to security that the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) does not need to increase its regulatory oversight of general aviation, according to a report issued by the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Inspector General (OIG). The TSA is part of the DHS.

June 18, 2009 - 11:39am

The Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Inspector General released a report on “TSA’s Role in General Aviation Security” that concludes: “We determined that general aviation presents only limited and mostly hypothetical threats to security.” The report notes that while the TSA’s Office of Intelligence (OI) “has identified several organizations that have shown an interest in using GA to obtain flight training or to launch attacks…it has

June 11, 2009 - 6:30am

An amendment to the Transportation Security Administration Authorization Act approved last week will allow the aviation industry to review and provide input on TSA security proposals. The amendment to H.R.2200 limits the TSA’s ability to use Security Directives to circumvent the normal rulemaking process without taking into account operational impact or economic burden.

June 3, 2009 - 7:43am

So here’s a pop quiz (true or false) for all you aviation enthusiasts:

1. All employees in safety-sensitive positions at U.S. airlines must be drug and alcohol tested.

2. These same employees need 10-year background checks before being hired.

3. Mechanics are considered as occupying safety-sensitive positions.

June 3, 2009 - 7:30am

With an effective deadline of June 1 looming, five trade associations sent a letter to Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano asking her to withdraw a Transportation Security Administration (TSA) directive that mandates identification badges to gain access to certain parts of airports that serve airlines–regardless of the number and frequency of flights.

June 2, 2009 - 11:22am

Parts counterfeiting presents a serious concern for manufacturers, and a California company has designed a technique to protect OEMs and operators. “About two percent of the 26 million parts installed on aircraft worldwide
are counterfeit; that’s roughly half a million parts, ranging from hardware to advanced electronics equipment,” Ben Jun, vice president of technology for Crypto- graphy Research, told AIN.

May 21, 2009 - 11:10am

A provision that would establish a general aviation working group to advise the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) on GA security issues is contained in the TSA Authorization Act expected to pass the House of Representatives before it adjourns tomorrow. The working group will look at security issues for general aviation facilities, including GA aircraft and helicopter operations at general aviation and commercial service airports.

May 19, 2009 - 12:28pm

A Transportation Security Administration directive mandating badging at airports serving commercial air carriers is scheduled to go into effect June 1. This requirement expands the airport identification process to include private aircraft owners, GA maintenance providers, FBO employees, flight instructors, flight school students and other airport tenants needing unescorted access to the airport operations area (AOA).

 
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