Transportation in the United States

March 11, 2013 - 12:30pm

Flight crew unions have opposed last week’s policy change by the Transportation Safety Administration (TSA) that will allow some knives in U.S. airliner cabins. Under its revised prohibited items list effective April 25, TSA will begin allowing knives with blades up to 2.36 inches in length and 0.5 inches in width to be carried aboard, as well as some wooden and metal clubs, all of which have been prohibited since the Sept. 11, 2011 terrorist attacks on the U.S.

March 11, 2013 - 10:15am

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has changed the rules and as of April 25 will allow small blades and sports implements such as golf clubs and lacrosse sticks to be carried on board by airline passengers. The rules would allow passengers to carry knives with blades shorter than 2.36 inches and narrower than half an inch, as long as they don’t have lockable blades. The existing rules prohibit most sharp objects, with the exception of scissors that are four or fewer inches in length, and also sports equipment. The TSA wants the rule change to harmonize U.S. security practices with those of other countries, which would make security screening more efficient. I’m not so sure about that.

February 25, 2013 - 1:58pm

The U.S. Department of Transportation and the Federal Aviation Administration have released details of the cuts they will make if mandated budget reductions from “sequestration” take effect March 1. The likelihood of Congress acting to prevent sequestration appeared to be dimming last week.

February 25, 2013 - 9:50am

Timothy Hershman, a Kona, Hawaii, resident, was indicted by a federal grand jury last week for falsely reporting a potential hijacking aboard an Alaska Airlines Boeing 737 en route to Seattle from Kona. Hershman called the FBI office in Honolulu January 17 and reported a hijacker might be aboard the aircraft, which caused the Oregon Air National Guard to scramble two F-16s to escort the aircraft to a safe arrival at Seattle, where the hoax was discovered.

February 21, 2013 - 3:40pm

A working group that counted 16 representatives from general aviation organizations, including NBAA, submitted a list of proposed revisions late last week to the Transportation Security Administration’s security guidance for GA airports. The document, originally published by the agency in 2004, contains voluntary guidelines and recommendations for GA airport owners, operators and users to address aviation security concepts, technology and enhancements.

February 5, 2013 - 5:55am
Crystal Air manages the 8,000-sq-ft FBO at newly opened Cleveland Regional Jetport in Tennessee.

Cleveland Regional Jetport held its grand opening on January 25 in Cleveland, Tenn. Intended to replace nearby Hardwick Field, the $42 million project was completed in two years. According to Mark Fidler, the new airport’s director of operations and marketing, Hardwick required replacement because it was cost prohibitive for the city to acquire surrounding residential properties needed to expand the runway beyond its 3,300 feet.

February 5, 2013 - 4:30am
The 32,800-sq-ft canopy at Houston’s Henriksen Jet Center can provide shelter for two  BBJs parked side by side.

When its new FBO facility opens in early April, the Henriksen Jet Center at Houston Executive Airport will feature the world’s largest aircraft arrivals canopy. The 32,800-sq-ft structure is large enough to provide shelter for a pair of Boeing Business Jets parked side-by-side. The FBO has operated from temporary trailers since its inception in 2006. The new 22,500-sq-ft terminal at the privately owned business aviation airport will offer 24-hour aircraft fueling, ground handling operations, rental and crew cars, crew lounge, catering services and complimentary wireless Internet access.

January 30, 2013 - 12:30pm

The Aeronautical Repair Station Association (Arsa) has launched a new survey to measure the impact of the ban on new foreign repair station certificates. The ban is the result of the U.S. Congress prohibiting the FAA from acting on foreign repair station certificate applications submitted after Aug. 3, 2008, because the Transportation Security Administration had not finalized repair station security rules.

January 21, 2013 - 12:50pm

The Regional Transportation Authority (RTA) for Chicago and its surrounding region has publicly charged United Airlines and American Airlines with running “sham” business operations conceived to circumvent city and RTA sales taxes. In a lawsuit filed against United last week, the RTA–a municipal corporation of government that oversees the Chicago area’s public transportation departments–claimed that the airline established shell offices in the town of Sycamore, Illinois, where it pays a total tax rate of 8 percent.

January 21, 2013 - 12:40pm

Rising sea levels and extreme weather events attributed to global climate change will increase the flood risk to airports and other transportation infrastructure in coastal regions of the U.S., according to the draft report of a government advisory committee. The trend over time will reduce the reliability and capacity of the transportation system, the study warns.

 
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