Air safety

June 9, 2014 - 12:20pm

The UK and Nepal signed a memorandum of understanding last week to cooperate in improving Nepal’s aviation safety record. All Nepalese airlines have been banned from operating within European Union airspace since last December. UK authorities will provide support in areas such as pilot training. A 2012 Sita Air accident claimed the lives of seven British citizens. A report by the European Commission on the state of Nepalese aviation safety is not expected before November this year.

June 7, 2014 - 12:40am

The FAA has launched an Aviation Safety Information Analysis and Sharing (ASIAS) program for the general aviation community, bringing to the sector a system many operators–from Parts 121 and 135 to GA pilots–are already using. The agency announced the one-year demonstration project on March 28.

June 5, 2014 - 2:44pm

NetJets’ repair stations achieved a new safety milestone yesterday, entering Level III of the FAA’s safety management system (SMS) program. As such, NetJets is the first repair station in the U.S. to achieve this safety level.

June 5, 2014 - 2:20pm

Australian minerals institute AusIMM awarded its Jim Torlach Health and Safety Award to the Flight Safety Foundation for its Basic Aviation Risk Standard (Bars) program, which was designed to audit aircraft operations that are used extensively for carrying mining company personnel. The institute noted the Bars program raised the level of minimum acceptable standards for aircraft operations worldwide. Bars consists of four components: risk-based international aviation standard, auditing program, aviation safety training programs and global safety data analysis program.

June 5, 2014 - 2:50am

A curious conundrum is causing confusion for international business jet operators flying to countries where ADS-B out equipment and capability is mandatory. While there is no requirement in the U.S. and Europe for operators to have a letter of authorization (LOA) for using ADS-B out equipment, some Asia-Pacific countries are requiring that operators carry an LOA with their aircraft’s paperwork when operating in airspace where ADS-B out is required. The problem is that asking FAA inspectors to add yet another LOA package to their overburdened workflows further delays issuance.

June 5, 2014 - 2:30am

A diverse panel of four aviation stakeholders kicked off the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s 13th annual aviation summit this spring in Washington, D.C., with a lively discussion of NextGen that seemed to indicate that all sides are moving closer to consensus on how the system should be built and funded.

June 4, 2014 - 2:50am

By now, all corporate and most general aviation aircraft owners are aware that by Jan. 1, 2020, their aircraft must carry an approved installation of an ADS-B out transmitter and an appropriate Waas receiver. And also by now, owners will probably have read accounts, or have been advised by their avionics suppliers and installers, that even with five-and-a-half years to go, booking installation dates to meet the deadline is getting tight.

June 3, 2014 - 4:20am

Significant numbers of business aircraft operators have made little or no progress in complying with key avionics mandates, according to new research commissioned by Honeywell Aerospace with data gathered from AIN readers. The survey identified the mandates for ADS-B out, Fans/PM-CPDLC datalink capability and Fans-1/A (North Atlantic region) as the most pressing concerns.

June 1, 2014 - 1:02am

Many of us in aviation in the U.S. haven’t been paying much attention to our neighbor to the north. Canadians are known for being somewhat quiet and unassuming. Sometimes it’s easy to forget that quiet and unassuming doesn’t mean they’re not busily working on practical solutions to important issues. In fact, there’s a lot going on in Canada that we in the U.S. could learn from in the aviation arena.

May 28, 2014 - 2:57pm

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration on Wednesday increased the limits of Boeing 787 extended twin-engine operations (ETOPS) from 180 to 330 minutes, Boeing announced on Wednesday. The approval allows the Dreamliner to operate as far as 330 minutes away from a diversion airfield, thereby allowing for more direct routes between long-range city pairs, particularly over the Pacific Ocean.

 
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