Air safety

October 3, 2007 - 11:15am

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) expected to have rules drafted by the end of last month that would allow “qualified” GA operations back into Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA).

October 3, 2007 - 11:03am

Security and safety training is suddenly a hot topic. When NBAA holds its convention next month, it is offering nearly a dozen new informational sessions that will address safety, security and business aircraft operations in today’s environment.

October 3, 2007 - 10:16am

Pilots and mechanics have been waiting since December for the Transportation Security Administration to act on Congress’ directive to incorporate a plan for giving airmen and mechanics a third-party review option if they lose their license for alleged security reasons. Although there have been no reports of FAA certificates being pulled due to regulations adopted in January 2003, the TSA has decided to suspend enforcing the rule.

October 3, 2007 - 10:13am

The fatal accident rate for business jet operations worldwide (fatal accidents per 100,000 flight hours) increased annually from 1998 to 2001 before decreasing in 2002, and from 1998 through 2002 air taxis had the highest fatal rate of all segments of turbine business airplane operations, according to figures in a new publication from the International Business Aviation Council. IBAC, in conjunction with Robert E.

October 3, 2007 - 9:53am

General aviation received some good news and some not-so-good news last month with regard to airport security.

October 3, 2007 - 8:59am

“The DOT would rather let an F-16 shoot down a hijacked airplane than let pilots carry guns in the cockpit,” was The Wall Street Journal’s response to Transportation Security Administration director John Magaw’s declaration “that I will not authorize firearms in the cockpit.” His decision overrides the wishes of airline pilots, who have been campaigning since September 11 to be allowed to carry guns as a barrier of last resort against terroris

October 3, 2007 - 8:15am

The Helicopter Association International (HAI) is asking Congress to appropriate $10.9 million for the FAA to “field weather, communications and surveillance equipment” to support low-level helicopter operations in the Gulf of Mexico. Congress passed legislation last year reauthorizing the FAA to fund such equipment, but the funds have yet to be appropriated.

October 3, 2007 - 8:03am

NBAA has turned to an outside vendor to assist in conducting the association’s security seminars. Houston-based Air Security International will join NBAA staffers in the seminars designed to give Part 91 operators the materials necessary for their companies to meet the standards required to obtain a TSA access certificate. TSAAC-holding operators eventually might gain access to TFRs equivalent to the scheduled airlines.

October 3, 2007 - 5:22am

Next month Securaplane Technologies will introduce CAMS, or cabin alert and monitoring system. CAMS consists of lightweight, low-power cameras and infrared light sources. The crew alert would be activated by a passenger or flight attendant and immediately illuminate an amber warning light on the flight deck, alerting the cockpit crew that something is amiss in the cabin.

October 3, 2007 - 4:59am

After completing the first five-year term as FAA Administrator in history, Jane Garvey will step down on August 4–and there will likely be no deputy waiting in the wings to bridge the gap to her successor. Monte Belger, who has been acting deputy administrator for several years, said he will retire July 31 after more than 30 years with the agency.

 
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