Air safety

February 17, 2014 - 1:54pm

The investigation into the EC135 fatal crash on November 29 in Glasgow, Scotland, is struggling to find any specific cause or telltale evidence. The investigators have determined that both of the helicopter’s engines flamed out, according to a special bulletin the Air Accidents Investigation Branch published on Friday. They now still have to understand why this happened with a functional fuel system and 25 gallons of fuel in the tanks.

February 12, 2014 - 10:01pm

Almost a month after announcing the latest schedule delay of the CSeries airliner, Bombardier still won’t identify the precise reasons for the slippage. Although the company continues to point to a lack of “overall systems maturity” for the latest change in service entry target from September of this year to the second half of next year, it hasn’t identified from which system or systems the problems might stem.

February 12, 2014 - 2:20am
Rockwell Collins claims its new MultiScan ThreatTrack weather radar delivers far more information about atmospheric threats than existing systems.

Rockwell Collins is introducing its new MultiScan ThreatTrack weather radar at this year’s Singapore Airshow. The avionics group claims the radar provides air transport aircraft with “unprecedented” atmospheric threat-assessment capabilities.

February 11, 2014 - 3:28pm

The Air Line Pilots Association International, FBI and FAA have jointly launched a campaign across 12 U.S. cities to raise public awareness about the consequences of illegal laser attacks on aircraft cockpits. Reports of aircraft laser illuminations in the U.S. have increased sharply over the past few years (partially fueled by an FAA website set up to report such incidents), from 2,836 in 2010 to 3,960 in 2013.

February 10, 2014 - 5:45pm
Japan’s solution to airspace congestion is CARATS (collaborative action for renovation of air traffic systems), which shifts from sectorized airspace to trajectory-based operations, managing flights on an end-to-end basis. Tests were recently completed using CARATS for 4-D trajectory approaches at Tokyo’s Haneda Airport.

Facing the demands of increasing air traffic capacity and operational efficiency, the countries of the Asia Pacific region have launched various programs to adopt recent advances in Air Traffic Management and advances inavionics technology over the past couple of decades. Some countries (notably Australia) have forged ahead, while others are further behind, but it is hoped that recent developments could see closer cooperation for an eventual move to a whole-area solution.

February 10, 2014 - 1:10pm

The International Business Aviation Council (IBAC) is considering a more streamlined version of its international standards for business aviation certification (IS-BAO) program. The goal is to encourage smaller flight departments to take part in the audits, which will bring them into compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization safety standards and best practices.

February 10, 2014 - 1:00pm

The Australian Airports Association has called for a full review of civil aviation safety authority (CASA) rules governing Australian airports. The group said the industry has identified a number of serious issues with the (current) manual of standards (MOS) Part 139, including the need to update the manual to reflect the latest developments in aircraft technology and airport operations.

February 9, 2014 - 6:00pm
Ice crystals can penetrate far into an engine and cause serious icing issues. Photo: NASA

Researchers are gradually coming to understand the physics of in-flight engine icing due to ice crystals. In response to this enhanced knowledge of the subject, civil aviation authorities, such as the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), are considering more stringent certification requirements.

February 7, 2014 - 9:35am
Hawker 4000s

The job of an FAA inspector must be incredibly boring. I imagine them sitting at their desks all day facing down gigantic piles of paper: letters of authorization, certification compliance packages, applications for operating certificates, enforcement actions, ad infinitum. And when the poor beleaguered inspector gets one pile stamped, signed and delivered, an FAA factotum appears with a new stack and thumps it onto whatever clear space remains in the office. Every day, looking up blearily from the stacks, our overworked inspector looks fondly out the window and wonders whether she can take a few minutes away from the office to visit the airport and see if her charges are playing nice or need some friendly nudging.

February 6, 2014 - 1:20pm

“There is a fundamental difference between the FAA and Department of Transportation Inspector General about non-citizen trust [NCT] aircraft registrations,” FAA deputy chief counsel Marc Warren told attendees this morning at the NBAA business aircraft finance, registration and legal conference in St. Petersburg, Fla. Last Friday, the DOT IG issued a memo that said the FAA still does “not have the information it needs on numerous aircraft owned under non-U.S.

 
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