Airworthiness

May 27, 2009 - 11:00am

Referring to the foreign repair station oversight language in the House FAA reauthorization bill (H.R.915) that passed last Thursday, William Voss, president and CEO of the Flight Safety Foundation, said he’s seen “no evidence whatsoever” that aircraft maintenance performed by non-U.S. repair stations is any less safe than that performed within the U.S., provided the repair stations and personnel are properly certified and regulated.

May 11, 2009 - 8:03am

As a recently approved continued airworthiness management organization (CAMO), aircraft maintenance provider Scandinavian Aircraft Technologies (ScanTech) of Denmark is now helping clients to meet the requirements of the new regulatory regime for operators.

May 6, 2009 - 12:24pm

The FAA has signed a bilateral aviation safety agreement and associated implementation procedures for airworthiness between the U.S. and Japan that allows for the reciprocal certification of aircraft and aviation products.

April 29, 2009 - 11:01am

Australia has changed its aviation regulations to simplify the process of developing Airworthiness Directives (ADs). Under the new system, ADs issued by a foreign aviation authority will be adopted automatically in Australia, and operators will be required to comply with ADs issued by the authority of the state of design of the aircraft.

April 29, 2009 - 7:54am

The current status of the 259 Eclipse 500 very light jets that were delivered before the manufacturer went bankrupt in February remains tenuous.

April 1, 2009 - 5:07am

Atlanta-based Atlantic Southeast Airlines last night voluntarily grounded 60 of its Bombardier CRJ200s after an internal audit showed that maintenance crews might not have inspected their GE CF34 turbofans according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. ASA operates 110 of the fifty-seat regional jets, as well as 38 seventy-seat CRJ700s and a pair of 76-seat CRJ900s.

March 3, 2009 - 2:56am

New European legislation has opened the door for third-party organizations to
be approved as continuing airworthiness management organizations (CAMO)
under EASA Part M Subpart G. Marshall Aerospace has been approved and is
now offering operators support by subcontracting continuing airworthiness
as well as fleet management.

February 27, 2009 - 8:26am

The EASA’s flat fee for a type certificate for a fixed-wing aircraft with an mtow of between 5.7 and 22 metric tons (encompassing the Cessna Citation CJ3 to the Falcon 900 series) is e1.06 million ($1.48 million). For a rotorcraft, it ranges from e20,000 to e525,000 ($28,000 to $735,000). Additional annual fees are levied to pay for the administration processes that ensure continued airworthiness.

January 29, 2009 - 10:09am

The UK Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) has approved Gulfstream’s London Luton Service Center to perform maintenance on EASA-registered Gulfstream G150s.

The amended certificate means the maintenance facility can now provide comprehensive service for the Gulfstream G550, G500, G450, G350, G200, G150, G400 and G300 as well as the GV, GIV-SP, GIV, GIII and GII.

December 23, 2008 - 7:52am

The UK Civil Aviation Authority has approved Gulfstream’s factory-owned London Luton service center to maintain Gulfstream G150s registered with the EASA. This approval makes Gulfstream’s Luton facility capable of servicing all Gulfstream models in Europe.

 
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