Global Positioning System

February 4, 2013 - 5:00am

The FAA granted TSO authorization to Garmin’s GDL 88 ADS-B solution, designed to bring ADS-B out and in capability to Part 23 aircraft flying below 18,000 feet to meet the Jan. 1, 2020 ADS-B out mandate. The GDL 88 receives on both ADS-B frequencies, 978 and 1090 mHz, allowing display of most traffic types as well as FAA-generated traffic feeds. The GDL 88 also includes Garmin’s TargetTrend relative motion technology to help pilots “visualize the trend of traffic threats as it relates to their aircraft,” according to Garmin.

January 4, 2013 - 2:10am

Accord Technology’s NexNav mini GPS receiver is now available to provide the GPS solution for Trig’s TT31 ADS-B out transponder. The combination of the NexNav mini and Trig TT31 meets the FAA’s 2020 ADS-B out mandate, which requires a GPS source that meets specific accuracy requirements (TSO-C145c Class Beta 1). The TT31 retails for $3,349 and with the NexNav mini is installable under an approved model list in a variety of aircraft. The NexNav mini costs $5,775. Flight-testing was done in a Mooney M20.

January 3, 2013 - 1:20am

It had always been ICAO’s intent that civil user services provided by the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) should be free of charges or user mandates, except for certain optional applications such as fee-bearing accuracy enhancements with performance guarantees. Europe’s Galileo is expected to offer such optional enhancements. But Russia has announced that it will mandate the carriage of receivers for its Glonass constellation in all aircraft on its civil aircraft register. GPS may also be used, but only when integrated with a Glonass receiver and its adjuncts.

January 2, 2013 - 4:35am

Russia’s announcement before ICAO’s November Air Navigation Conference that it intends to mandate that all aircraft on the Russian civil register carry, by January 2018, that country’s Glonass system or combined Glonass/GPS equipment but not GPS or other foreign GNSS as a stand-alone system (see AIN, November, page 48) met resistance from the international community during the November gathering.

December 4, 2012 - 5:35am

Operators of the Gulfstream IV, GIV-SP, G400 and G300 can now upgrade their Honeywell FMZ-2000 flight management system with Waas-LPV capability. The new FMS 6.1 upgrade is available from Gulfstream service centers and takes about five days to install, including addition of two GPS antennas, two Waas receivers and two cockpit annunciators.

November 28, 2012 - 7:13pm
SCR Scrab UAV

UAV Navigation, a developer of flight-control avionics and motion sensors for unmanned aircraft, said it demonstrated its LCAP autopilot system in a “sea-skimming” target UAV designed to mimic the threat of an incoming missile.

November 14, 2012 - 12:47pm

Wichita’s Yingling Aviation recently completed the installation of a new digital panel on a Cessna 425 Conquest I. It includes dual Garmin G600 avionics coupled with an S-Tec 2100 digital flight control system autopilot. Garmin’s GTN 650 combines in a small package GPS, com and nav functions with multifunction display capabilities such as high-resolution terrain mapping, graphical flight planning, multiple weather options and traffic display. It also includes a touchscreen interface.

November 12, 2012 - 1:40pm
Chris Lutat

Accidents in recent years have brought glass panel training and operational excellence under the spotlight, and the industry continues to develop training and safe practices to keep up with the new technology.

November 3, 2012 - 3:15am

Russia plans to announce this month that its civil aviation fleet will be required to carry Glonass, that nation’s GNSS, or combined Glonass/GPS units, but not GPS on its own. The mandate will be unveiled at this month’s triennial ICAO Air Navigation Conference, and it has significant cost implications for western-built corporate aircraft on the Russian register, all or most of which likely carry just GPS. Foreign-registered aircraft flying in Russian airspace would be exempt from the rule.

November 3, 2012 - 3:15am

Russia plans to announce this month that its civil aviation fleet will be required to carry Glonass, that nation’s GNSS, or combined Glonass/GPS units, but not GPS on its own. The mandate will be unveiled at this month’s triennial ICAO Air Navigation Conference, and it has significant cost implications for western-built corporate aircraft on the Russian register, all or most of which likely carry just GPS. Foreign-registered aircraft flying in Russian airspace would be exempt from the rule.

 
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