Aviation accidents and incidents

June 24, 2014 - 3:54pm

The U.S. National Transportation Safety Board has determined that Asiana Flight 214 crashed on July 6 last year at San Francisco International Airport because the flight crew mismanaged the approach and inadequately monitored airspeed. Announcing the findings at a meeting on Tuesday in Washington, D.C., the Board also found that the complexities of the autothrottle and autopilot flight director systems and the crew’s misunderstanding of those systems contributed to the accident.

June 23, 2014 - 12:10pm

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is expected to announce the probable cause of last summer’s crash of an Asiana Boeing 777 at San Francisco International airport at a June 24 meeting. The doors to the NTSB’s board room at 429 l’Enfant Plaza SW, in Washington, D.C. open at 7:30 a.m. EST, with the meeting due to begin at 9:30 a.m. EST. The session can also be viewed online.

June 13, 2014 - 3:04pm

The NTSB’s investigation into the Gulfstream IV-SP that crashed while taking off from Runway 11 at Bedford Hanscom Field near Boston on May 31 appears to be focusing on the twinjet’s control wheel mechanical gust-lock system, according to a preliminary accident report released by the agency today. “After the rotate callout, the cockpit voice recorder captured comments concerning aircraft control,” the report notes. All seven aboard–three crewmembers and four passengers–died in the accident.

June 12, 2014 - 2:40pm

The pilot of a Papillon Airways air-tour Airbus AS350B3 was killed May 18 at a helistop at the bottom of the Grand Canyon after exiting the helicopter for a fluid check while leaving the engine running and the blades turning, according to an NTSB preliminary report issued on Tuesday. Witnesses said the empty helicopter then became airborne, hit the ground and rolled over. Its rotor blades struck and killed the pilot.

June 9, 2014 - 12:55pm

National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigators are closely analyzing the contents of cockpit voice and flight data recorders recovered intact from the wreckage of the Gulfstream IV that crashed May 31 on takeoff from Bedford-Hanscom Field (BED) in Massachusetts. The accident killed all four passengers and three crew on board.

June 7, 2014 - 12:40am

The FAA has launched an Aviation Safety Information Analysis and Sharing (ASIAS) program for the general aviation community, bringing to the sector a system many operators–from Parts 121 and 135 to GA pilots–are already using. The agency announced the one-year demonstration project on March 28.

June 5, 2014 - 6:00pm

The pilots of the Gulfstream IV-SP that crashed on Saturday while taking off from Runway 11 at Bedford Hanscom Field near Boston reported “control problems” after reaching rotation speed, according to preliminary cockpit voice recorder information released by the NTSB on Tuesday evening. All seven people aboard–three crewmembers and four passengers–died in the runway overrun accident.

June 3, 2014 - 3:43pm

NTSB investigators located the cockpit voice and flight data recorders last night from the Gulfstream GIV-SP that crashed at about 9:40 p.m. on Saturday while taking off from Runway 11 at Bedford Hanscom Field near Boston under FAR Part 91 operating rules. All seven aboard were killed, including passengers Lewis Katz (co-owner of the Gulfstream), Anne Leeds, Marcella Dalsey and Susan Asbell, and the three crewmembers–chief pilot James McDowell, copilot Bauke “Mike” de Vries and flight attendant Teresa Benhoff.

June 3, 2014 - 3:25pm

This year is shaping up to be bad for business jet fatal accidents, according to safety figures compiled by AIN. In just the first five months, 24 people have died in five fatal business jet accidents worldwide. In total last year, there were 23 deaths from eight business jet accidents. To date, U.S.-registered business jets were involved in three accidents, resulting in 12 fatalities–including Saturday’s Gulfstream IV-SP crash near Boston that killed seven. In all of last year, six U.S.-registered business jet fatal accidents killed 17 people.

June 2, 2014 - 4:20pm

NTSB investigators are probing the May 31 fatal crash of a Gulfstream IV at Bedford-Hanscom Field Airport in Massachusetts. According to NTSB senior investigator Luke Schiada, the U.S.-registered aircraft (N121JM) crashed into a gully in a wooded area about 2,000 feet beyond the end of Hanscom’s Runway 11. It exploded and became engulfed in flames. All seven people on board–two pilots, a flight attendant and four passengers–were killed. An eyewitness told NTSB officials that the GIV, which was departing for Atlantic City, N.J., never got off the ground.

 
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