EBACE Convention News

Yasava Takes Cabin Design In A New Direction

 - May 22, 2013, 10:00 AM
Yasava describes its Astral executive seat as "a dramatic departure from conventional design."

In a joint venture with MCM DesignStudio, Lausanne-based Yasava Solutions (Booth 971) is taking business jet cabin design in a new direction based on “intelligent ergonomics and socio-cultural design.” The cabin design and engineering firm is initially introducing its Astral Design Series interior proposals for large-cabin business jets. According to CEO Christopher Mbanefo, the company is currently in talks with major OEMs and focused on Dassault’s Falcon 7X, Bombardier’s Global 6000 and Gulfstream’s G650 as platforms.

A key component of the Astral cabin is the 16-g, fully-articulating and rotating Aïana seat, a product designed and engineered by Yasava and MCM DesignStudio. When fully reclined it becomes a full-flat individual bed, six feet six inches long and 25 inches wide. With four Aïana seats in a VVIP cabin four people can sleep at once, and no one has to put their head in a place where another might have sat (an abhorrent practice in many cultures). Certification of the Aïana seat is expected in early 2014.

“Most of today’s large-cabin business jet cabins have been developed for the traditional North American and European markets,” explained Mbanefo, who is a professional pilot and graduate of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and Ohio State University with a degree in aerospace engineering. “With the Astral Design Series, we’ve gone back to basics with what we believe will be the growth markets of the future, Brazil, China, India and Russia. Yasava Solutions has developed aircraft interiors that finally meet the ergonomic requirements of the 21st century user, while consciously addressing the cultural sensitivities of the individual markets.”

Just as important, said Yasava creative director Milena Cvijanovich of MCM DesignStudio, “Clients now expect their space to conform to their lifestyle, and not the other way around.”

The Astral concept has distinct cabin zones. Aft of the galley is a staff cabin with standard seating for four, followed by the main cabin with four of Yasava’s electrically articulated Aïana seats with the Aïzen “wireless remote jewel” seat control unit. Aft of the main cabin is a lounge for the owner with a double Aïana patent-pending seat that converts from a sofa to a double-size full-flat bed. Between each cabin section are louvers that can be closed to create privacy barriers. Further aft is a redesigned lavatory, which in a Global 6000 or Gulfstream G650 permits installation of a stand-up shower and includes in-flight access to the main baggage storage area.

A full chef’s galley with induction cooking capability is included. Forward of the galley, the crew rest area has also been redesigned in a modular style so that it can accommodate storage of passenger luggage and hanging items on shorter trips, when an extra pilot is unnecessary.

Yasava is negotiating at EBACE with selected completion and refurbishment centers and MROs that will be responsible for obtaining the Astra Design Series cabin STCs. “We are also talking with potential clients for the interior,” said Mbanefo.

The company does have a track record. Founded in 1988 by Mbanefo, Yasava was appointed an exclusive representative for Bombardier Business Aircraft in 1999. MCM DesignStudio, whose primary expertise is as an international boutique architecture and design firm, is also located in Lausanne. The company was founded in 1994 by Cvijanovich and Denis Muller.

Staff writer Amy Laboda also contributed to this article.

Comments

Cinthie George's picture

I find this design really interesting and long overdue. Finally a 21st century solution is offered for business aircraft, which includes full flat bed seats. I'm intrigued how they were able to come up with these 'obvious' solutions. Am definitely keen to see the first installation!!

John Wales's picture

I like the concept. Can anyone who saw the seat tell me how it is comfort wise?

Chad Trautvetter's picture

Wish I could. There were too many people waiting in line at EBACE to try it out that I wasn’t able to wait around for a turn. It is an intriguing design.

Show comments (3)